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19th Sarajevo International Film Festival, 2013

 

Ivan Velisavljević
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Ivan Velisavljević

Ivan Velisavljević (Serbia)

Ivan Velisavljević was born in 1982 in Šabac, Serbia. He graduated from the University of Belgrade with a degree in General Literature with Theory of Literature and also Dramaturgy. Ivan then completed a MA in Comparative Literature, with a thesis in Filmology, at the University of Zagreb. He has worked in the story department of Hollywood production company Phoenix Pictures and as a journalist, columnist, film and literary critic in various printed and online magazines. Ivan is the founder of the Novi Kadrovi project (www.novikadrovi.net), a hub for film critics in Serbia, and also co-editor of the book "New Frames — Neglected History of the Serbian Cinema" (2008). His film and literary criticism have been published in leading journals, magazines and newspapers in ex-Yugoslavia. Ivan has also directed and penned several documentaries, short and experimental films, produced by his independent production Satibara Film.

1. Why do you like to write about films?
Writing about film is the continuation of watching the film by other means. It literally is re-viewing: recreating and enhancing the film experience by evoking its form, by searching for connections, patterns, innovations and meaning. For me, to write about films is to take the final step in the process of filmmaking — to think, analyze and clarify, to give that play of light and shadows some sense. It is to become a viewer as an essential part of the conversation with filmmakers, and transform an act of consuming the film into a two-way communication with the film. I could say I like to write about films because I see this process as a creative activity inspired by the creativity of others, transformed into a social act of discussion. In the end, to write about films also means to communicate with yourself — to find the voice you prefer, to sharpen your critical and observational skills, to define your taste and criteria, to look for the best expression of your inner dilemmas about wider social problems raised by films.

2. In what ways do you think you will benefit from participating at the STC?
I believe the STC provides a good opportunity to develop all these potentials to their highest level. First of all, for the whole week, without thinking about existential problems of food, enough money and time, and a place to sleep, I can watch as many films possible; films which are relevant to the contemporary European art of film, which I am very interested in. Secondly, I can become involved in an active discussion with the filmmakers and fellow critics, and try to find the inter-subjective starting ground for film criticism. Lastly, I will be able to exchange ideas, correct hypotheses, and critically reassess some of my own presumptions and criteria.

Burning Money, Carving Cows arrow.
Exit Fuzzy Reality. Enter Naked Death arrow.

 

Karla Lončar
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Karla Lončar

Karla Lončar (Croatia)

Karla Lončar was born in Zagreb in 1984. She graduated with a degree in Sociology and Comparative Literature, from the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Zagreb, where she is currently completing a PhD program in Literature, Performing Arts, Film and Culture. Karla also works as an associate at the Miroslav Krleža Institute of Lexicograpy. She is a regular contributor to the Croatian Film Chronicle (Hrvatski filmski ljetopis), Filmonaut magazine and the Third Program of Croatian Radio. Karla has been the managing editor at the Croatian Film Chronicle since 2012.

1. Why do you like to write about films?
The short and plain answer: One never knows about oneself.
The longer version, hopefully narrated by professor Louis Levy, a character from Woody Allen's Crimes and Misdemeanors: "I love the art of film, the medium itself. I like thinking and learning about its form and content, as well as its innate ways of depicting 'reality' with all its meanings."

2. In what ways do you think you will benefit from participating at the STC?
The short and plain answer: In many ways.
The longer version, once again hopefully narrated by professor Louis Levy, aforementioned character from Woody Allen's Crimes and Misdemeanors: "I'm looking forward to participating at the STC because I haven't participated in similar projects before. I hope to meet inspirational people, learn new ways of observing film and perfect my written English."

Structuring the Reality arrow.
Eroding Youth arrow.

 

Georgiana Madin
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Georgiana Madin

Georgiana Madin (Romania)

Georgiana Madin studied Screenwriting and Filmology, and has been writing film reviews and essays for the bimonthly Film Menu for three years. Apart from that, she has worked on a short literary magazine project for a Bucharest-based advertising agency. In 2012, she was a member of the Émile Cantillon Jury of the Namur International Film Festival. Currently, she is also involved in translating and editing the English issues of the magazine she is writing for. While not convinced that she deserves to be considered a film critic yet, she finds the struggle of phrasing her thoughts on film as riveting and as joyfully fearsome as any physical adventure.

1. Why do you like to write about films?
It is not until I have to ask questions like these that I actually recognize the possibility to conventionally "like" writing about films. In the humble days when I began doing it, it was more a vital means to pierce through the surface layer of a film. It was an unlabeled and sterile activity, viewed as the bane of film creativity in my school, but also a less populated terrain that attracted the more inquisitive minds that did not feel at ease with creating without a conscience. Now I am convinced that I continued doing this primarily out of a desire to teach myself how the substance of film really comes into being and how it affects viewers, and I can say that there is no better way for me to understand reality than through a contrived version of it that impels me to identify its mechanisms.

2. In what ways do you think you will benefit from participating at the STC?
For me, the highlight of the STC is the chance to cross the boundaries between mentalities, while bouncing the ball within the same playground. Since writing often makes one feel like an awkward and lone gambler, groping in the dark after a confirmation of their ideas, it is great to have the chance to observe how other writers are dealing with self-doubt and how they integrate their slippery perceptions of the world into a solid broader outlook on films. If I am wrong in my assumption that most writers (and film critics especially) are tormented by the need to draw only thoroughly thought-out conclusions, I am delighted to be hit by the ball and summon up the courage to display my most personal views. In the absence of an ideal reader, thinking and writing about films seems like addressing a shapeless void, and that is why meeting similar people would make this void a little more bearable.

An Insect's Passing Fancy arrow.
The Bridge of Age arrow.

 

Daniel Mandić
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Daniel Mandić

Daniel Mandić (Serbia)

Daniel Mandić is a journalist, film critic and blogger. He is currently developing workshops which aim to combine the techniques of filmmaking and media with the interdisciplinary research methods of the field of visual arts, literature and social theory. While finishing his Master's thesis in Comparative Literature, Daniel's work focuses on Semiotics and Postcolonial Studies. He is interested in mythology and structures of narration, as well as poststructuralist ideas of transfering classical text into the hypermodern context.

1. Why do you like to write about films?
For me, writing about films is an artistic form of journalism that lets me dive deep into the often blurry stories beneath films; searching for those universal but complex elements of life itself that we can all attach to, and then honing them with care in order to transform and evolve. A hard process, during which I regard Hollywood blockbusters and art-house films as being on equal terms.

2. In what ways do you think you will benefit from participating at the STC?
First of all, I hope I'll get a chance to meet and talk to Leos Carax, l'enfant terrible of European cinema and one of its most original authors, and furthermore gain an interview with him. Second, I'm really looking forward to experience the workshops of film criticism, since I can't even imagine what to expect. I'm already sure I'm going to leave STC very satisfied, not least with having been able to develop a professional network with new colleagues, having heard their own ideas and views over writing about films.

Facing Mirrors arrow.
No Rest for the Wicked arrow.

 

Raffi Movsisyan
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Raffi Movsisyan

Raffi Movsisyan (Armenia)

Raffi Movsisyan was born in 1988. From 2005-2012 he studied at the Department of Film Criticism in the Yerevan State Institute of Theatre and Cinema. In 2010 he participated at the Film School, organized for young filmmakers from CIS countries in Moscow and received a "Promising Young Film Critic" award. He received his MA in 2012. Raffi's articles are published both online and in print. He works at the Golden Apricot Yerevan International Film Festival, as a Film Programmer.

1. Why do you like to write about films?
I think film criticism is the best road to becoming acquainted with — as well as researching — cinema from different perspectives. It's a wonderful skill, particularly if you aim to make your own films in future.

2. In what ways do you think you will benefit from participating at the STC?
I'm very proud and happy to have the chance to participate at STC this year, and surely it will contribute to the development of my professional skills. Generally speaking, it's a wonderful opportunity to network with other members of the same profession, from various countries, and to understand their positions towards contemporary cinema and cinema criticism as a whole.

Following the Sun arrow.
The Big Problem of the Little Room arrow.

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Sarajevo 2013

bullet. Index
bullet. Talent Press
bullet. Burning Money
bullet. Exit Fuzzy Reality
bullet. Structuring the Reality
bullet. Eroding Youth
bullet. An Insect's Passing Fancy
bullet. The Bridge of Age
bullet. Following the Sun
bullet. The Big Problem
bullet. No Rest for the Wicked
bullet. Facing Mirrors